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To Dance, It Takes Two and To Fight Too

Analyzing what tools are available to change anxiety, hostility, tension, or bad temper for openness and disposition can make a big difference.

The Woman Post | Paula Rincón, Co-founder of Think & Talk

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A constant conversation in my office revolves around how we can develop tools, skills, and ways for people to be better managers of hostile situations. Because everything seems to indicate that human beings tend to be rude by nature, this does not mean that we should tolerate it or simply let it pass.

What can we do to handle certain situations intelligently? I did not put the title of this article at random; it turns out that behavior is contagious. A bad situation can trigger another and another. But if we are aware of this, we will also understand that our well-being, happiness, and productivity can be seriously affected by allowing these chains of unfortunate events, and we will be more willing to give them a prompt and correct solution.

Using natural abilities such as understanding, kindness, or sympathy can be one of the strategic resources to change this type of rudeness for empathy and transform a discussion into a conversation.

It is important to get out of the emotional moment, breathe and analyze with perspective if the person is really abusive or if suddenly the heat of the moment and the conversation led to the point that is not satisfactory or comfortable for both of us. Only then will we lead it to a building space. Significant, although it is a natural tendency, it is useless to match in tone, behavior, or emotion that which bothers us.

Analyzing what tools are available to change anxiety, hostility, tension, or bad temper for openness and disposition can make a big difference and transform infinite disagreements into constructive space.

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And, of course, clearly maintain the framework of respect. This includes speaking and calling things by their name because, on many occasions, the person in a difficult emotional moment is unaware of the behavior they adopt. It is our task to make them fall into account to stop the situation and resume the framework of calm or until the end of the discussion to resume it at a time when the two are on the same page.

Finally, let us understand that no single reason justifies accepting or staying in spaces that do not build; each of us determines the limit and knows how far tolerance goes.