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How to Overcome Revenge Bedtime Procrastination

Although the term “bedtime procrastination” was coined quite recently, millions of people regularly fall prey to this phenomenon. What can you do to stop sabotaging your sleep?

Although the term “bedtime procrastination” was coined quite recently, millions of people regularly fall prey to this phenomenon. What can you do to stop sabotaging your sleep?

Person lying down looking at his cell phone

Photo: Pexels

Hillary Walker

Do you find yourself falling down internet rabbit holes late at night? After a hard and stressful day, it is difficult to transition into the bedroom routine. Although the term “bedtime procrastination” was coined quite recently, millions of people regularly fall prey to this phenomenon. What can you do to stop sabotaging your sleep?

Defining the Habit

This type of procrastination has three key components, according to the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. First, it reduces sleep time. Secondly, it has no external cause. Finally, procrastinators are well aware of the consequences. They do not use Delta 8 vape, as their goal is not to relax, but to take their life back.

Revenge procrastinators stay up because they are frustrated by responsibilities encroaching on their personal life. They feel that they have no control over their leisure time.

Effects And Solutions

By procrastinating, you steal from your morning self and accumulate sleep debt. An adult needs at least 7 hours of sleep per night to be healthy, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sleep deprivation affects cognition (ability to think) and increases the risk of diabetes, depression, and heart disease. Try the following:

1. Create a Commute

Commuting recalibrates your mind. Even if you work from home, take a walk before and after the workday. Shut down your computer and head outdoors instead of turning on the TV.

2. Stop Trying to Do Everything in a Day

Procrastination often stems from trying to cram too many tasks into 24 hours. Edit your to-do list and so you will not need to unwind for hours close to midnight. Otherwise, you will find yourself pumped up late in the evening, so the urge to browse will be irresistible.

3. Find Healthy Nighttime Activities

If you cannot get to sleep, choose restful activities. Instead of binging on Netflix, read a book. Abstain from alcohol, as it disrupts REM sleep so you feel tired in the morning. Choose something healthy and constructive that helps you unwind.

4. Set an Alarm

Set up a gentle reminder, so you know when it is time to get ready for bed. When you procrastinate, time flies by quickly. An alarm might encourage you to stop wasting time.

5. Do Not Touch Your Phone

Give yourself 15-20 minutes to fall asleep. If this is difficult, do not reach for your TV remote or smartphone. Instead, get up and move around the house until you feel tired. Staying in bed is not helpful, and getting stimulated by the blue light will only make things worse. Try reading, stretching or meditating, and try falling asleep again.

6. Consider Therapy

Bedtime procrastination is not a form of insomnia, but sleep deprivation is a big problem. Cognitive behavioral therapy can help determine and modify the negative beliefs and feelings affecting your ability to sleep. After identifying the causes of procrastination, your therapist will suggest sleep-inducing habits.

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