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Brexit: How tense is the situation right now?

After a great year of negotiations and disagreements between Brussels and London, the Brexit could reach its final agreement under a 'secret plan' of Theresa May

Brexit: How tense is the situation right now?

2018 has been the year of the Brexit. The United Kingdom's exit from the European Union is getting closer and closer and the eyes are on the Prime Minister, Theresa May, along with the negotiations between London and Brussels.

Leer en español: Brexit: ¿Cómo está el panorama a poco tiempo de que suceda?

The panorama around the Brexit includes many events and key characters that question the realization of this separation, for the first time seen in the European Union, with a mutual agreement that does not affect the country in a long term.

The biggest concern, and probably the key point, has been the situation of the two Irelands. Brussels and London have been negotiating since September how the border between Ireland (EU country) and Northern Ireland (British province) will be so as not to generate instability and problems in the future.

The proposal known to the public and the media is to maintain the customs union. With this, the United Kingdom would remain within the common customs territory for a period of transition, until the end of 2020, with the expectation of a new agreement of economic relationship.

The parties within the United Kingdom have been critical of the way in which negotiations have taken place and the policy of a 'hard Brexit' that has characterized the prime minister. Who at the time was the minister of Brexit, David Davis, is his biggest critic and now with other ministers and parliamentary partners of the Democratic Unionist Party, (DUP) ask May to show Parliament Cox's analysis on the Irish border issue  that is still the most important clause until London and Brussels do not have a new trade agreement.

May aims to reach a commitment to hold an extraordinary Brexit summit between November 15 and 22, according to an article in El Mundo, to bring an agreement to the House of Commons in December.

The first is conquering the Labor Party with the proposal of the customs union, but now are the businessmen and the most conservative line in their party who seek to make her responsible for a 'Brexit without agreement' that could have negative consequences for the country economically.

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The call for a second referendum is still being discussed among those who regret voting for Brexit and those who disagree with the negotiations between London and Brussels. What was once led by the unions, now is led by more than 50 managers of large companies in the country with the Business for Peoples Vote campaign.

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As part of the opposition to Brexit, these executives published a letter through the Sunday Times to rectify the call for a second referendum. "The business community was promised that if the country voted for the Brexit we would continue to enjoy a friction-free trade with the EU and that we would have the necessary certainty about our future relationship in order to make long-term investments. efforts of the prime minister, all the proposals exchanged between the Government and the European Commission have fallen short and do not come close to the agreement we enjoy today with the EU. "

Under the tutelage of democracy, the call for a second referendum would be ideal. However, the prime minister has rejected on considerable occasions that this process would be 'betray democracy ' of those who voted in favor at the time. The reality is that Theresa May does not have an absolute majority in the House of Commons and her party is increasingly divided. The Brexit needs an agreement that meets the needs of both parties as soon as possible if it wants to pass the House of Commons and materialize by March 29, 2019.

 

LatinAmerican Post | Diana Ramos

Translated from: 'Brexit: ¿Cómo está el panorama a poco tiempo de que suceda?'

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