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Donald Trump could face a political trial

Pelosi said they would open a formal investigation, also called a political trial or "impeachment", against the president, assuring that he had violated the constitution.

LatinAmerican Post | Juliana Suárez

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Leer en español: Donald Trump: ¡A juicio político!

Many of Donald Trump's initiatives during his presidency have been stalled and subsequently forgotten because his biggest rival within the government has been Congress, especially under the command in the House of Representatives of Democrat Nancy Pelosi.

On Tuesday, September 24, Pelosi said at a press conference that they would open a formal investigation, also called impeachment in English, against the president, assuring that he had violated the constitution.

On this occasion, it was made known through the US intelligence services that "Trump threatened to withhold military aid from his country to force Ukraine to investigate allegations of corruption against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter," the BBC said. The denounced aid was stopped, it had already been approved by the congress. Therefore, if it were verified that this was the case, President Donald Trump would have acted above the legislature to meet other needs.

 

 

During the speech, the Democrat said that "the intelligence community inspector general, formally notified the Congress that the administration was forbidding him from turning over a whistleblower complaint." Later, she referred to the acts of the president as a "betrayal of the homeland," which is why she says he should be investigated.

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With this, Pelosi as the highest figure in the House of Representatives, announced that they will initiate the investigation against Donald Trump to achieve a possible removal. The concern is also that the country's funds could be misused.

How does the impeachment process work?

According to the Constitution of the United States, a president can be dismissed and even convicted for performing betrayed to homeland, bribery or other serious crimes.

The so-called impeachment takes place in Congress, so that in order to achieve this, approval would be needed first in the Lower House, to finally go to the Senate.

In the specific case of this Congress, Pelosi's statements open the door for all the allegations in which President Trump is implicated to be investigated. The House of Representatives has a Democratic majority and "more than 145 of the 235 members are in favor," said the BBC. So most likely, he would win the vote in favor of dismissal.

However, the initiative is complicated to Pelosi to pass the Senate, because there the Republican Party is a majority. In addition, although only 51% approval is needed in the House of Representatives, two thirds (67%) are needed in the Senate.

The announcement, although it was alarming, is not entirely new, as Congress is already carrying out several investigations against him. However, what it does achieve, in addition to media pressure, is that the investigations begin to move forward with faster steps. According to Pelosi's speech, Trump has six other open investigations, so regardless of the possible results of the trial, there are more chances of at least affecting the re-election of Donald Trump.

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What it is true is that the formalization of the complaint allows Pelosi to create a committee that focuses mainly on carrying out this investigation. Meanwhile,  the “six House committees are expected to continue investigating President Trump on impeachable offenses and to send their strongest cases to the Judiciary Committee”, the New York Times said.

President Donald Trump has assured that the detention of the funds was only carried out to pressure Europe, and has called Pelosi's statements a "presidential persecution," since he says that the Chamber has not even seen the transcript of the call.

 

 

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