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Let's dance! Songs for December that are not Christmas carols

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December it's already here and we present you this music to hear on these dates. Interestingly, they are not Christmas carols

Let's dance! Songs for December that are not Christmas carols

December is a month of celebration without any doubt, and although the origin of this celebration is Christian, it celebrates the birth of the prophet of Christianity, it has already become a multicultural party that is celebrated in almost every corner of Latin America and the Caribbean world. Even if you are not linked to any religion, you can be part of the holiday celebration full of recreation and the union of family and friends. This is why we present this Christmas music that has nothing to do with religions of any kind and that you can hear at this end of the year.

Leer en español: ¡A bailar! Música para escuchar en diciembre que no son villancicos

Venezuelan bagpipes

The Venezuelan bagpipes are originally from the State of Zulia and are traditional to sing in December. They are usually sung by a group of men and women who take turns singing. Although sometimes they touch religious subjects, mainly with references to the Virgin of Chiquinquirá, the themes of the bagpipes are varied. The political denunciation and the mockery to the government are very frequent subjects in this music, although also more jocose and light subjects as the party. The bagpipes from Zulia were declared Heritage Heritage of Cultural and Artistic Interest of Venezuela . The singer-songwriter Ricardo Aguirre is one of his greatest and most respected representatives.

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Mexican Rancheras

This genre transcends the month of December, no doubt. And the music that floods it is not exclusively for Christmas because we listen to it all year long. However, do not be weird if your uncle wants to hear this Christmas all the repertoire of the king of the ranchera, José Alfredo Jiménez. This Mexican singer wrote several songs about December and about Christmas. Most are a lament, they are songs of spite, like all their good songs. But they are perfect for shouting in all the family gatherings that you will have to attend this December. Undoubtedly, the rancheras have not only transcended the month of December but also the borders, because we sing them inside and outside of the Mexican territory.

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Colombian cumbias and porros

The Andean artist of December par excellence is Pastor Lopez. This Colombian-Venezuelan made the majority of his musical career in Colombia but is known throughout Latin America and even in North America. His music is not necessarily from December but certainly, this month is when we mostly listen to him. His successes "El hijo ausente" and "Las caleñas" will also be part of the repertoire of the family dinner this December. And speaking of Caribbean rhythms such as porro and cumbia, vallenatos and the popular music of spite that for some reason rises again in the lists during the month of December will not be missing either.

Cumbia villera

It is of Argentine origin. It is not exclusive for the month of December. In Argentina, it is heard in discos throughout the year. But curiously, the music we hear at the end of the party is also what we hear at the end of the year. The cumbia villera is related to the Argentine lower class, with the emergency village. Take, therefore, influences of street rap and rock in their songs, but of the Colombian cumbia in its forms. Thus, the result is this music that although is listened all the year in the Argentine and Chilean celebrations, it also shoots in the month of December in the rest of Latin America. Like the Venezuelan gaitas, the cumbia villera sometimes takes also political themes and denunciations.

Encourage yourself to live a different Christmas! Get out of the burrito sabanero and give the opportunity to popular music in Latin America.

 

LatinAmerica Post | Juliana Rodríguez Pabón

Translated from "¡A bailar! Música para escuchar en diciembre que no son villancicos"

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